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dc.contributor.authorKrzyzosiak, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Gen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-20T23:41:53Z
dc.date.available2022-01-20T23:41:53Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationCurriculum Matters, 15, 42–58. doi:10.18296/cm.0036
dc.identifier.issn1177-1828en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14844
dc.description.abstractThis article analyses research literature and policy texts to investigate the extent to which culturally responsive education policies can improve Māori achievement in schools. It presents a snapshot of current levels of Māori inequity, which is followed by an account of the history of Māori education policy to illustrate the origins of the current situation. Contemporary policies for Māori education, based on cultural responsiveness, are analysed in terms of their potential to succeed in overcoming Māori inequity. While it is important for teachers and schools to engage in culturally responsive practice, blind faith in these policies as “the solution” to Māori underachievement is unrealistic, and has the potential to place unfair responsibility for raising Māori student achievement on schools and teachers, rather than on government or policy itself.
dc.publisherNZCER Press, New Zealand Council for Educational Researchen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.nzcer.org.nz/node/61219
dc.rightsThis is the accepted version of the following article: [view Source] which has been published in final form at [view DOI]
dc.subjectCultural responsiveness; Policy; Educational inequity; Māori education policy
dc.titleCan Culturally Responsive Policies Improve Māori Achievement?en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.18296/cm.0036en_NZ
aut.relation.endpage58
aut.relation.startpage42
aut.relation.volume15en_NZ
pubs.elements-id371508
aut.relation.journalCurriculum Mattersen_NZ


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