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dc.contributor.authorWaudby, Ben_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPoulston, Jen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-09T22:51:35Z
dc.date.available2017-11-09T22:51:35Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCTHR-10-2016-0102
dc.identifier.issn1750-6182en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/10960
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This qualitative study examines employee responses to sexual behaviour in hospitality workplaces, to determine their roles and responsibilities in harassment prevention. Design: Female workers in restaurants and bars were recruited using the snowball technique, and data collected through 18 interviews. An interpretivist approach was used to guide the data collection and analysis. Findings: The study found that harassment coping strategies developed with age and experience rather than through training, and those who dressed and behaved provocatively attracted more unwanted sexual attention. Practical implications: Recommendations focus on the role of managers in moderating employee behaviour and providing training in assertiveness. Social implications: Industry norms and perceptions about managers’ expectations are considered strong influences on employee behaviour, and therefore, in attracting harassment. Originality: Although this study locates the responsibility for stopping harassment with management, it takes an unusual and potentially unpalatable approach by acknowledging the role of victims in stopping unwanted sexual advances, providing new approaches to reducing harassment.
dc.publisherEmeralden_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/IJCTHR-10-2016-0102
dc.rightsCopyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2006. Authors retain the right to place his/her pre-publication version of the work on a personal website or institutional repository for non commercial purposes. The definitive version was published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at www.emeraldinsight.com (see Publisher’s Version).
dc.subjectHospitality; Power; Sexual harassment; Sexualisation; Women
dc.titleSexualisation and Harassment in Hospitality Workplaces: Who Is Responsible?en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/IJCTHR-10-2016-0102en_NZ
aut.relation.issue4en_NZ
aut.relation.volume11en_NZ
pubs.elements-id288604
aut.relation.journalInternational Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Researchen_NZ


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