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dc.contributor.authorMules, PA
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-04T03:19:24Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-04T03:45:40Z
dc.date.available2012-07-04T03:19:24Z
dc.date.available2012-07-04T03:45:40Z
dc.date.copyright2005-07
dc.date.issued2012-07-04
dc.identifier.citationAnnual Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Communication Assiciation held at University of Canterbury, Christchurch New Zealand, 2005-07-04 - 2005-07-07, published in: Using Virtual Stories to Resolve Workplace Miscommunication
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/4499
dc.description.abstractwww:workstories.ac.nz is an Auckland University of Technology, Faculty of Arts Learning and Teaching initiative. The aim of the site is to provide an online learning tool that is a flexible, interactive textbook/teaching resource. The key differentiating feature of the site is that authentic student experiences of communication breakdown in the workplace are valued, collected and posted online to create a rich, unfolding source of core site content and an online venue for AUT Communication students to share, discuss and resolve these experiences. Threaded through these stories is support and advice from peers and teachers. In semester 1, 2005 www.workstories.ac.nz has been piloted with level 4 students who are studying interpersonal communication as part of AUT’s Diploma of Information Technology. These students are from a diverse range of backgrounds, ages and ethnicities. Some are part-time students who are working while studying, some are recent school leavers, some are older learners who have had a range of experiences in the working world, and some are international students. Many of the students are hoping to staircase to degree courses. This paper describes the motivation, and pedagogical rationale, behind www.workstories.ac.nz. It examines the unique potential that the online medium offers for using true stories as the central tool for learning, and reports some of the feedback that has been collected from students in light of these claims. The site has been piloted as a teaching tool in semester 1, 2005 and will be the subject of research and evaluation in semester 2, 2005. The research will be based on student and teacher feedback and analysis of the site discourse, and will ask the question: what, if any, demonstrable value does www.workstories.ac.nz offer to students learning about workplace miscommunication? Until this research has been completed the benefits of using this approach to teach workplace communication skills are unproven.
dc.publisherAustralian and New Zealand Communication Association Inc.
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/4498
dc.relation.replaces10292/4498
dc.relation.urihttp://www.anzca.net/conferences/anzca05proceedings.html
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher's Version)
dc.subjectStories
dc.subjectAuthentic experience
dc.subjectWorkplace
dc.subjecte-learning
dc.titleUsing virtual stories to resolve workplace miscommunication
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
aut.conference.typePaper Published in Proceedings


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