Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEnari, D
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-11T02:20:33Z
dc.date.available2021-11-11T02:20:33Z
dc.date.copyright2021-01-01en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Social Inclusion, 12(1), pp.64–69.
dc.identifier.issn1836-8808en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14659
dc.description.abstractTertiary institutions perpetuate colonial legacies, teaching Eurocentric curriculums and using English as the language of instruction with little regard for non-European pedagogy. Many students from non-Western backgrounds have felt they needed to neglect their cultural ways of being and knowing to assimilate in university classes. University cultural clubs aim to be a safe space for different ethnic groups to gather on campus. As a former member of a university cultural club – the Griffith Pasifika Association, I tell our story and provide an analysis of our experience. I feel much of my cultural and academic success attributes to this group, and for many of its members, this association is a family, where we can learn about our cultural heritage. This club was not only a space for supporting students from the Pacific Islands, but also for solidifying member’s cultural pride. This association has caused necessary disruption to the traditional Eurocentrism of tertiary education, but, through this process, the University itself has now become a new domain for cultural pride for Pasifika students.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractTertiary institutions perpetuate colonial legacies, teaching Eurocentric curriculums and using English as the language of instruction with little regard for non-European pedagogy. Many students from non-Western backgrounds have felt they needed to neglect their cultural ways of being and knowing to assimilate in university classes. University cultural clubs aim to be a safe space for different ethnic groups to gather on campus. As a former member of a university cultural club – the Griffith Pasifika Association, I tell our story and provide an analysis of our experience. I feel much of my cultural and academic success is attributed to this group, and for many of its members, this association is a family, where we can learn about our cultural heritage. This club was not only a space for supporting students from the Pacific Islands, but also for solidifying member’s cultural pride. This association has caused necessary disruption to the traditional Eurocentrism of tertiary education, but, through this process, the University itself has now become a new domain for cultural pride for Pasifika students.
dc.publisherSchool of Human Services and Social Work, Griffith University
dc.relation.urihttps://josi.org.au/articles/abstract/216/
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CCBY-NC-ND-4.0). View this license’s legal deed and legal code for more information.
dc.subjectCultural pride; Pasifika students; Pacific Island student; Minority student clubs/associations; Tertiary/ university education
dc.titleI Have Cultural Pride in a Western Space: University Cultural Clubsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
aut.relation.endpage69
aut.relation.issue1en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage64
aut.relation.volume12en_NZ
pubs.elements-id440383
aut.relation.journalJournal of Social Inclusionen_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record