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dc.contributor.authorPlank, L
dc.contributor.authorweston, S
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-18T22:15:46Z
dc.date.available2014-12-18T22:15:46Z
dc.date.copyright2014-12-31
dc.identifier.citation2014 AGU Fall Meeting held at Moscone West (800 Howard Street) and Moscone South (747 Howard Street), San Francisco, California, 2014-12-15 to 2014-12-19
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/8250
dc.description.abstractThe AuScope VLBI array was built with the purpose to improve the terrestrial (TRF) and celestial reference frames in the southern hemisphere. Since 2010 the three 12-m antennas in Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) heavily contribute to the global VLBI observations coordinated by the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry. In 2011, the AUSTRAL VLBI program was started, with more than 40 sessions being observed so far. In the AUSTRALs, the three AuScope antennas observe together with the new 15-m dish in Hartebeesthoek (South Africa) and the 12-m antenna in Warkworth (New Zealand). Recently, the planned observations have been expanded again, with 50 additional sessions scheduled until mid-2015, along with 3 continuous campaigns covering 15 days each. All AUSTRALs are recorded with an increased data rate of 1 Gbps, allowing to compensate for the reduced sensitivity of the generally smaller dish size. We evaluate the positive impact of the AuScope VLBI program on the global TRF. This is due to the increased number of observations and the improved homogeneity of the global VLBI network. All data collected within this intense observing program is analysed and geodetic results are presented. This includes time series of baseline lengths and station coordinates of the contributing stations. We compare the results obtained within the regional AUSTRAL sessions with the ones of the classical global VLBI networks and identify superiorities and shortcomings of both. The high number of sessions gives high accuracies and good repeatabilities of the determined parameters. Additionally, remaining variations of baseline lengths can be identified and are compared against by default un-modelled station motions due to hydrology and atmosphere loading. Finally, we give an outlook on future plans for the AuScope antennas and the AUSTRAL observing program: on future operations, expected improvements through hardware upgrades as well as research on the use of sibling telescopes available at two sites within the AUSTRAL array (Hobart and Hartebeesthoek).
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU)
dc.relation.urihttps://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/meetingapp.cgi#Paper/26560
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher's Version).
dc.titleThe impact of the AuScope VLBI observations and the regional AUSTRAL sessions on the TRF
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
pubs.elements-id173418


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