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dc.contributor.authorJones, KMen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBalalla, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTheadom, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorJackman, Gen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFeigin, VLen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-04T03:27:31Z
dc.date.available2019-04-04T03:27:31Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBMJ Open 2017;7:e015470. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015470
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/12416
dc.description.abstractBackground Accurate prevalence figures estimating the number of survivors of poliomyelitis (disease causing acute flaccid paralysis) following poliovirus infection are not available. We aim to undertake a systematic review of all literature concerning the prevalence of survivors of poliomyelitis. Methods Electronic databases were searched from 1900 up to May 2016 for peer-reviewed studies using a population-based approach witha defined denominator and some form of diagnostic or clinical verification of polio. Exclusion criteria were any prevalence data that were unable to be extracted or calculated and studies reporting on incidence only. The quality of each included study was assessed using an existing tool modified for use in prevalence studies. Average crude prevalence rates were used to calculate worldwide estimates. Results Thirty-one studies met criteria with 90% of studies conducted in low-income to lower middle-income countries. Significant variability in the prevalence of survivors of poliomyelitis was revealed, in low- income to lower middle-income (15 per 100 000 in Nigeria to 1733 in India) and upper-middle to high-income countries (24 (Japan) to 380 per 100 000 (Brazil). The total combined prevalence of survivors of poliomyelitis for those studies at low to moderate risk of bias ranged from 165 (high-income countries) to 425 (low-income to lower middle-income countries) per 100 000 person-years. Historical lameness surveys of children predominated, with wide variation in case definition and assessment criteria, and limited relevance to current prevalence given the lack of incidence of poliovirus infection in the ensuing years. Conclusions These results highlight the need for future epidemiological studies of poliomyelitis to examine nationally representative samples, including all ages and greater focus on high-income countries. Such efforts will improve capacity to provide reliable and more robust worldwide prevalence estimates.
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
dc.relation.urihttps://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/7/e015470#
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titleA Systematic Review of the Worldwide Prevalence of Survivors of Poliomyelitis Reported in 31 Studiesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015470en_NZ
aut.relation.articlenumbere015470en_NZ
aut.relation.endpage9
aut.relation.issue7en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage1
aut.relation.volume7en_NZ
pubs.elements-id283720
aut.relation.journalBMJ Openen_NZ


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