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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKlymchuk, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.editorBergqvist, Een_NZ
dc.contributor.editorÖsterholm, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.editorGranberg, Cen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorSumpter, Len_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-19T03:58:05Z
dc.date.available2018-10-19T03:58:05Z
dc.date.copyright2018-07-03en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 42nd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 5, p. 46). Umeå, Sweden: PME.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/11896
dc.description.abstractIn this talk, we present an overview of a project aimed at integrating puzzles, paradoxes, sophisms and provocations (later for convenience called just ‘puzzles’) into university mathematics courses during traditional lectures. By a puzzle we mean a non-standard, non- routine problem with a counterintuitive answer and a surprise solution presented in an entertaining way. Normally a puzzle looks deceptively simple and doesn’t require specific knowledge (domain free). The intention of using puzzles in teaching and learning is to engage students' emotions, creativity and curiosity and also enhance their critical thinking skills. The theoretical considerations of the project were based on the Puzzle-Based Learning concept (Michalewicz & Michalewicz, 2008) that has become increasingly popular worldwide and Guilford’s well- established model of creativity (Guilford, 1959). The impact of the pedagogical strategy was evaluated via questionnaires, interviews and class observations involving 137 students from four groups at two universities. Each lecturer used puzzles in their lectures on a regular basis (2-3 a week) during a semester. The students were able to choose to solve them individually or in small groups in class. It took only 7-10 minutes a week and was not part of the course assessment. The vast majority of the participants reported that integrating puzzles in their courses helped them to improve their problem-solving (91%) and generic thinking skills (92%). Also, 82% of the participants commented on other benefits from using this pedagogical strategy – primarily increasing motivation and enhancing creativity. The project was an extension of a pilot study by Klymchuk (2017) and was supported by a grant from Ako Aotearoa New Zealand National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence.
dc.publisherInternational Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME)en_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.pme42.se/
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 left to the authors. All rights reserved.
dc.titlePuzzle-based Learning in University Mathematics: Students’ Perspectivesen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
aut.relation.endpage46
aut.relation.startpage46
aut.relation.volume5en_NZ
pubs.elements-id348130
aut.relation.conference42nd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-42)en_NZ


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