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dc.contributor.advisorShinkfield, Carol
dc.contributor.authorButler, Julie Karen
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-26T01:39:59Z
dc.date.available2011-05-26T01:39:59Z
dc.date.copyright2011
dc.date.issued2011-05-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/1225
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores whether individual temperament influences the development of the parent-child attachment relationship. Temperament theory and attachment theory are explored, and neuro-scientific research is investigated in relation to the origins and impact of temperament and attachment in infant brain development. The research method used in this study is a modified systematic literature review, with the findings summarised but not quantified, as is the case in a more traditional literature review. A considerable amount of the literature clearly delineated each construct as a separately operating entity in the development of the infant. However, many researchers have investigated these constructs simultaneously and established that temperament and attachment are in fact interwoven and are bi-directional in nature; in other words, both exert their influence on development. This study shows that both parent and child are active participants in the parent-child attachment relationship, each bringing their individual contributions to bear on its development. The research implies that temperament does, therefore, exert its influence on the development of the parent-child attachment relationship. Furthermore, the findings clearly highlight that the parent/s have the greater resolve within the relationship and that difficulties in individual temperament styles are able to be mediated through a parent’s sensitivity and responsiveness to the infant’s signals and developmental needs.
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectAttachment
dc.subjectPyschotherapy
dc.subjectTemperament
dc.subjectInfant
dc.titleDoes temperament influence the parent-child attachment relationship?
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Dissertations
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health Science
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2011-05-26T01:08:13Z


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