Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMacCulloch, Tony
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Sandra Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-26T03:33:23Z
dc.date.available2018-02-26T03:33:23Z
dc.date.copyright2004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/11329
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this qualitative pilot study was to investigate and gain a greater understanding of the patient-physiotherapist relationship from the perspective of the patient with chronic pain. Four adults with chronic pain who had recently completed or were currently participating in an Activities-based physiotherapy programme volunteered to participate. To collect the data, four individual face to face semi-structured interviews of approximately one hours duration were held with each participant. The contents of the interviews were analyzed for themes relevant to the physiotherapist-patient relationship. Themes that emerged were grouped into three categories according to their significance and role. Four Driver themes: ‘showing understanding’, ‘engendering trust’, ‘being credible’ and ‘explaining’, interacted with each other and had a strong effect on patient motivation. A further five themes: ‘communication’, ‘working style’, ‘supporting’, ‘challenging’ and ‘physiotherapist attributes’ served to ensure that the Driver functions could proceed. Four contextual themes: ‘relationship development’, ‘relationship strength’, ‘family role’ and ‘ACC’ constituted a framework within which the patient-physiotherapist relationship functioned. The ‘motivation’ theme was found to have a significant role in the physiotherapist-patient relationship. The physiotherapist-patient relationship which consists of both the physiotherapist-patient interaction and the therapeutic intervention was seen as having a significant role in motivating patients to engage in the physical treatment. Due to its non-physical nature and physiotherapy often focusing on physical treatment it is often neglected. However, it has the potential to have a powerful role in motivating the patient to engage with physical treatment. It is important that physiotherapists are aware of the physiotherapist-patient role and have adequate interpersonal skills to bring about an effective relationship. Further investigation into the physiotherapist-patient relation from the perspective of the patient is recommended.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectPhysical therapists -- New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectChronic pain -- Physical therapyen_NZ
dc.subjectTherapist and patient -- New Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleThe significance of the physiotherapist-patient relationship from the perspective of the patient with chronic pain: A qualitative pilot studyen_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health Scienceen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record