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dc.contributor.authorMorpeth, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBrenton-Rule, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFrecklington, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRome, Ken_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-09T22:50:34Z
dc.date.available2016-03-09T22:50:34Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationClinical Rheumatology. DOI: 10.1007/s10067-015-3124-6en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1434-9949en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/9609
dc.description.abstractFear of falling, foot pain, impairment and disability are commonly reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the relationship between fear of falling and foot pain, impairment and disability has not been investigated in established RA. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between fear of falling and foot pain, walking velocity and foot impairment and disability in women with established RA. A secondary aim was to evaluate differences between fear of falling, foot pain, walking velocity and foot impairment and disability in women with established RA and age- and sex-matched control participants. Twenty-one women with established RA and twenty-one age- and sex-matched controls were assessed for fear of falling, foot pain, foot impairment and disability and walking velocity. Pearson’s r-correlations were used to examine relationships between fear of falling and the foot measures. Independent samples t tests evaluated the differences in fear of falling and foot measures between the two groups. In people with RA, significant correlations were found between fear of falling and foot impairment (r = 0.53, p = 0.015), foot disability (r = 0.77, p <0.001) and walking velocity (r = 0.56, p < 0.001). No correlation was found between fear of falling and foot pain (r = 0.36; p = 0.11). Significant differences between cases and control participants were found between fear of falling (p = 0.001), foot impairment (p = 0.004) and foot disability (p < 0.001). Foot impairment and disability relates to fear of falling in women with established RA. A better understanding of fear of falling in people with established RA may contribute to more efficient falls assessments in order to identify at risk individuals.
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rightsAn author may self-archive an author-created version of his/her article on his/her own website and or in his/her institutional repository. He/she may also deposit this version on his/her funder’s or funder’s designated repository at the funder’s request or as a result of a legal obligation, provided it is not made publicly available until 12 months after official publication. He/ she may not use the publisher's PDF version, which is posted on www.springerlink.com, for the purpose of self-archiving or deposit. Furthermore, the author may only post his/her version provided acknowledgement is given to the original source of publication and a link is inserted to the published article on Springer's website. The link must be accompanied by the following text: "The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com”. (Please also see Publisher’s Version and Citation).
dc.subjectFear of falling; Foot disability; Foot impairment; Foot pain; Rheumatoid arthritis
dc.titleFear of falling and foot pain, impairment and disability in rheumatoid arthritis: a case-control studyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10067-015-3124-6
pubs.elements-id193387


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