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dc.contributor.authorSImonen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSheard, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorD'Souza, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLuxton-Reilly, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPutro, IHen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Pen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTeague, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWhalley, JLen_NZ
dc.contributor.editorD'Souza, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.editorFalkner, Ken_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-23T03:04:20Z
dc.date.available2015-10-23T03:04:20Z
dc.date.copyright2015-01-27en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationIn Proc. 17th Australasian Computing Education Conference (ACE 2015) Sydney, Australia. CRPIT, 160. D'Souza, D and Falkner, K. Eds., ACS. 137-146en_NZ
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-921770-42-5en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1445-1336en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/9142
dc.description.abstractThe computing education literature shows some recent interest in assessment in introductory programming, with papers analysing final examinations and other papers proposing small sets of examination questions that might be used in multiple institutions as part of a benchmarking exercise. This paper reports on a project that aimed to expand the set of questions that might be used in such benchmarking exercises, and at the same time to identify guidelines for writing good examination questions for introductory programming courses, and, by implication, practices to avoid when writing questions. The paper presents a set of ten questions deemed suitable for use in the exams of multiple courses, and invites readers to use the questions in their own exams. It also presents the guidelines that emerged from the study, in the hope that they will be helpful to computing educators writing exams for their own courses.en_NZ
dc.publisherAustralian Computer Society, Inc.en_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://crpit.com/abstracts/CRPITV160Simon.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsCopyright © 2015, Australian Computer Society, Inc. This paper appeared at the 17th Australasian Computing Education Conference (ACE 2015), Sydney, Australia, January 2015. Conferences in Research and Practice in Information Technology (CRPIT), Vol. 160. D. D’Souza and K. Falkner, Eds. Reproduction for academic, not-for-profit purposes permitted provided this text is included.
dc.subjectIntroductory programming; CS1; Assessment; Benchmarking; Examination
dc.titleHow (Not) to Write an Introductory Programming Examen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
aut.relation.endpage146
aut.relation.startpage137
aut.relation.volume160en_NZ
pubs.elements-id173622


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