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dc.contributor.authorBoiarkina, Ien_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDepree, Nen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorYu, Wen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Ben_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Den_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-05T03:03:31Z
dc.date.available2015-10-05T03:03:31Z
dc.date.copyright2015-09-27en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationAsian Pacific Confederation of Chemical Engineering (APCChE) held at Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre (MCEC), Victoria, Australia, Melbourne, Australia, 2015-09-27 to 2015-10-01, published in: Asian Pacific Confederation of Chemical Engineering (APCChE)en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/9092
dc.description.abstractInstant whole milk powder (IWMP) is designed to rapidly dissolve in water, which depends on the particle size distribution (PSD) and agglomeration. The warm and delicate milk powder exiting the dryer is transported via either pneumatic conveying or bucket elevators to packing. The gentleness of this powder transport process is important for IWMP, as it can break down the agglomerates, generating excess fines, which leads to poor dissolution properties. This work looked at the breakdown of milk powder at two different, geographically separate, industrial IWMP plants, using the Malvern Mastersizer, a laboratory laser diffraction instrument, and sieving, to evaluate the importance of breakdown on the final product properties given different conveying methods. It was found that the method of measurement affected the results, with sieves showing a larger powder size reduction during transport as compared with the Mastersizer. PSDs with a larger average size at the start of powder transport showed more breakdown, with a greater decrease in the average particle size. However, the larger decrease was not enough to compensate for the initially larger average particle size, and powder that started out with larger agglomerates at the fluidised beds still had a larger average particle size at packing. The Mastersizer appeared to break the large agglomerates during measurement, especially with powder that had not been through the entire transport line, thus masking the extent of the size reduction, however this could only occur to weaker agglomerates. Thus in order to produce IWMP with the desired functionalities, the focus should be on improving agglomeration as oppose to reducing transport breakdown to achieve the desired particle size distribution.
dc.publisherAsia Pacific Confederation of Chemical Engineering (APCChe)
dc.relation.urihttp://www.apcche2015.org/
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher's Version).
dc.subjectMilk powder; Particle size; Powder breakdown
dc.titleSignificance of powder breakdown during in-plant transport at industrial milk powder plantsen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
pubs.elements-id188053


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