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dc.contributor.authorHarwood, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWeatherall, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTalemaitoga, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAlan Barber, Pen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGommans, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Wen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, Ken_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMcNaughton, Hen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-29T23:59:56Z
dc.date.available2015-07-29T23:59:56Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationNew Zealand Medical Journal, vol.125(1364), pp.57 - 67en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn0028-8446en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1175-8716en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/8996
dc.description.abstractThe Hua Oranga instrument, developed for Maori people with mental illness, showed good responsiveness and adequate psychometric properties in Maori and Pacific people after stroke. Its simplicity, relative brevity, minimal cost and adequate psychometric properties should favour its use in future studies with both Maori and Pacific people. Suggestions are made for refinements to the measure. These should be tested in a new population before Hua Oranga is recommended for general use in a clinical setting. Abstract Aim Health outcomes research for Maori has been hampered by the lack of adequately validated instruments that directly address outcomes of importance to Maori, framed by a Maori perspective of health. Hua Oranga is an outcome instrument developed for Maori with mental illness that uses a holistic view of Maori health to determine improvements in physical, mental, spiritual and family domains of health. Basic psychometric work for Hua Oranga is lacking. We sought to explore the psychometric properties of the instrument and compare its responsiveness alongside other, more established tools in an intervention study involving Maori and Pacific people following acute stroke. Method Randomised 2x2 controlled trial of Maori and Pacific people following acute stroke with two interventions aimed at facilitating self-directed rehabilitation, and with follow-up at 12 months after randomisation. Primary outcome measures were the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) of the Short Form 36 (SF36) at 12 months. Hua Oranga was used as a secondary outcome measure for participants at 12 months and for carers and whanau (extended family). Psychometric properties of Hua Oranga were explored using plots and correlation coefficients, principal factors analysis and scree plots. Results 172 participants were randomised, of whom 139 (80.8%) completed follow-up. Of these, 135 (97%) completed the Hua Oranga and 117 (84.2%) completed the PCS and MCS of the SF36. Eighty-nine carers completed the Hua Oranga. Total Hua Oranga scores and PCS improved significantly for one intervention group but not the other. Total Hua Oranga scores for carers improved significantly for both interventions. Total Hua Oranga score correlated moderately with the PCS (correlation coefficient 0.55, p<0.001). Factor analysis suggested that Hua Oranga measures two and not four factors; one 'physical-mental' and one 'spiritual-family'. Conclusion The Hua Oranga instrument, developed for Maori people with mental illness, showed good responsiveness and adequate psychometric properties in Maori and Pacific people after stroke. Its simplicity, relative brevity, minimal cost and adequate psychometric properties should favour its use in future studies with both Maori and Pacific people. Suggestions are made for refinements to the measure. These should be tested in a new population before Hua Oranga is recommended for general use in a clinical setting.
dc.publisherNew Zealand Medical Association (NZMA)
dc.relation.urihttp://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/read-the-journal/all-issues/2010-2019/2012/vol-125-no-1364/article-harwooden_NZ
dc.rightsCopyright © New Zealand Medical Association, 2012. All Rights Reserved. Authors retain the right to place his/her publication version of the work on a personal website or institutional repository for non commercial purposes. The definitive version was published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher’s Version).
dc.titleAn assessment of the Hua Oranga outcome instrument and comparison to other outcome measures in an intervention study with Maori and Pacific people following strokeen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
aut.relation.endpage67
aut.relation.issue1364en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage57
aut.relation.volume125en_NZ
pubs.elements-id133598


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