Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMuratovski, G
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-04T22:31:07Z
dc.date.available2015-02-04T22:31:07Z
dc.date.copyright2014-12-30
dc.identifier.citationIn Proceedings of the 5th Annual Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand (PopCAANZ), Hobart 18-20 June, 2014, pp. 45-53.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/8380
dc.description.abstractIn the face of an underlying theoretical structure that links the subjects of propaganda and politics with architectural and design practice, it can be argued that both designers and architects often use ideologies (self-invented or borrowed) to shape their communicative and design processes. It is their beliefs and dialogues that condition what ideals may lead to a better society and how these ideals can be put into practice—often for the benefit or to the detriment of the society at large. In most cases, these practices are juxtaposed with moral and ethical issues that are too great to be ignored.
dc.publisherPopular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand (POPCAANZ)
dc.relation.urihttp://popcaanz.com/conference-proceedings/conference-proceedings-2014/
dc.rightsAuthors retain the right to place his/her publication version of the work on a personal website or institutional repository for non commercial purposes. The definitive version was published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher’s Version).
dc.subjectPolitics
dc.subjectEthics
dc.subjectDesign
dc.subjectArchitecture
dc.subjectPropaganda
dc.titleThe burden of ethics: the use of design and architecture as political propaganda
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
aut.publication.placeHobart, Australia
aut.relation.endpage53
aut.relation.startpage45
pubs.elements-id178704


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record