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dc.contributor.authorThomas, P
dc.contributor.authorThomas, S
dc.contributor.authorKersten, P
dc.contributor.authorJones, R
dc.contributor.authorSlingsby, V
dc.contributor.authorNock, A
dc.contributor.authorDavies Smith, A
dc.contributor.authorBaker, R
dc.contributor.authorGalvin, K
dc.contributor.authorHillier, C
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-12T02:59:04Z
dc.date.available2015-01-12T02:59:04Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationBMC Neurology 2014, 14:109 doi:10.1186/1471-2377-14-109
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/8279
dc.description.abstractBackground Fatigue is one of the most common and debilitating symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness at 1-year follow-up of a manualised group-based programme (‘FACETS’) for managing MS-fatigue. Methods One-year follow-up of a pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial. People with MS and significant fatigue were randomised to FACETS plus current local practice (FACETS) or current local practice alone (CLP), using concealed computer-generated randomisation. Participant blinding was not possible. Primary outcome measures were fatigue severity (Global Fatigue Severity subscale of the Fatigue Assessment Instrument), self-efficacy (MS-Fatigue Self-Efficacy) and disease-specific quality of life (MS Impact Scale). Results Between May 2008 and November 2009, 164 participants were randomised. Primary outcome data were available at 1 year for 131 (80%). The benefits demonstrated at 4-months in the FACETS arm for fatigue severity and self-efficacy largely persisted, with a slight reduction in standardised effect sizes (SES) (−0.29, p = 0.06 and 0.34, p = 0.09, respectively). There was a significant difference on the MS Impact Scale favouring FACETS that had not been present at 4-months (SES −0.24, p = 0.046). No adverse events were reported. Conclusions Improvements in fatigue severity and self-efficacy at 4-months follow-up following attendance of FACETS were mostly sustained at 1 year with additional improvements in MS impact. The FACETS programme provides modest long-term benefits to people with MS-fatigue.
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2377-14-109
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.subjectRandomised controlled trial
dc.subjectMultiple sclerosis
dc.subjectFatigue
dc.subjectIntervention
dc.subjectEnergy effectiveness
dc.subjectCognitive behavioural
dc.subjectGroup
dc.titleOne year follow-up of a pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of a group-based fatigue management programme (FACETS) for people with MS
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2377-14-109
aut.relation.issue109
aut.relation.volume14
pubs.elements-id177507


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