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dc.contributor.advisorFarrer, Joan
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-18T21:28:14Z
dc.date.available2010-02-18T21:28:14Z
dc.date.copyright2009
dc.date.issued2010-02-18T21:28:14Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/817
dc.description.abstractThe primary aim of this practice based project is to promote debate and alter perceptions of second-hand materials and ReFashion concepts. The work is positioned between the developed world business model extremes of overproduction, and over-consumption, in clothing manufacture. Practical work which represents 80% of this thesis, pitches discarded clothing as an untapped commodity. The investigation poses questions and possibilities with respect to applying the ReFashion concept to a potential business model. By developing prototypes through deconstruction and reconstruction processes, reflection upon current practices of the secondary textile industry has been possible, highlighting ReFashion as a potential ‘Materials Recovery’ process. The second outcome for the research is to provide contextualised information for the fashion manufacturing industry and government agencies, in order to develop innovative applications for new markets.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectReFashion
dc.subjectOverproduction and over-consumption
dc.subjectSustainability
dc.subjectPost-consumer textile waste
dc.subjectReManufacture
dc.subjectPractice based research
dc.titleReDress - ReFashion as a solution for clothing (un) sustainability
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Art and Design
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2010-02-18T04:52:38Z


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