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dc.contributor.authorBahri, Shamshulen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorJaafar, Noor Ismawatien_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-04T01:20:10Z
dc.date.available2014-12-04T01:20:10Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_NZ
dc.date.issued2014-12-08en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the 25th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, 8th - 10th December, Auckland, New Zealand
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-927184-26-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/8089
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we suggest factors that influence the survival of a government’s open source software (OSS) project. Specifically, we investigated the OSS implementation by the Malaysian government since 2002. The odds were stacked against the implementation when there was a change of leadership, strong pressure from the proprietary software vendors and the less-than-stellar track record of large-scale information technology implementation such as this. The theoretical lens of this study was the Actor-Network Theory (ANT) while the method used to identify the factors that influence the survival of the OSS project was the case study research. Our findings suggest that the survival of the project was strongly influenced by the network built by its human and non-human actors that led to the successful enrolment and translation of the implementation.en_NZ
dc.publisherACIS
dc.titleAgainst All Odds: How A Government’s Open Source Software (OSS) Implementation Surviveden_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess


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