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dc.contributor.authorMules, PA
dc.contributor.editorHorsley, M
dc.contributor.editorBrien, DL
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T02:53:38Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T02:53:57Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T02:54:19Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T02:54:52Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T02:55:09Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T02:56:25Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T02:56:43Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T02:53:38Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T02:53:57Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T02:54:19Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T02:54:52Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T02:55:09Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T02:56:25Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T02:56:43Z
dc.date.copyright2013-10-01
dc.date.issued2014-01-29
dc.identifier.citationTEXT, Journal of writing and writing courses, vol.Number 23(Special Issue Website Series), pp.1 - 11 (11)
dc.identifier.issn1327-9556
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/6639
dc.description.abstractChanges in the way we produce, consume and distribute personal commmunication are subtly mediating new perceptions about communication appropriateness and literacy. While not denying that ideational content is an important carrier of meaning, this paper argues that it is the changing material composition of screen based (as opposed to paper based) personal correspondence that is challenging traditional perceptions. It outlines two methodological perspectives that allow us to compare personal correspondence, such as a letter written on paper, with a text or a tweet. It then compares several different examples of personal correspondence from pre-digital and digital times in order to show how our perceptions of what constitutes effective, appropriate and literate personal correspondence are changing, and to show that the conventions around the personal textual communication of traditional letters were just a highly formalised genre – a set of snobberies shaped by the unique materialities of the literacy tools of the day.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAustralian Association of Writing Programs (AAWP)
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/6633
dc.relation.replaces10292/6633
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/6634
dc.relation.replaces10292/6634
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/6635
dc.relation.replaces10292/6635
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/6636
dc.relation.replaces10292/6636
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/6637
dc.relation.replaces10292/6637
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/6638
dc.relation.replaces10292/6638
dc.relation.urihttp://www.textjournal.com.au/speciss/issue23/content.htm
dc.rightsCopyright of all work published in TEXT remains with the authors.
dc.subjectWriting
dc.subjectLiteracy tools
dc.subjectMateriality
dc.subjectMultimodality
dc.subjectDigital personal correspondence
dc.titleChallenging the conventions of personal correspondence: txting times for literacy snobs
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
aut.relation.endpage11
aut.relation.issueSpecial Issue Website Series
aut.relation.pages11
aut.relation.startpage1
aut.relation.volumeNumber 23
pubs.elements-id157625


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