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dc.contributor.authorClear, Tony
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-27T22:14:25Z
dc.date.available2009-05-27T22:14:25Z
dc.date.copyright2002
dc.date.created2002
dc.date.issued2009-05-27T22:14:25Z
dc.identifier.citationCSS Journal, 10, 2, 1-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/558
dc.description.abstractThis paper urges a rather more critical view of e-learning than that taken to date. It is argued that strong forces are converging to redefine education as a commercial rather than public activity, of which e-learning is one element. Inherently different perceptions of the teaching and learning process, based upon a commercial rather than a public model, combined with a certain amount of naïve technological progressivism are challenging the role of higher education. Poor implementations based upon flawed assumptions are also likely to lead to an e-learning bust in much the same way as the dot com phenomenon has collapsed under the weight of its own hype. The case is argued for diverse and informed models of education (including e-learning approaches) that nurture local cultures and values, and produce socialized, adaptable and capable citizens rather than captive globalised consumers, colonized by monoculture online.
dc.publisherCSS Journal
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher's Version).
dc.sourceCSS Journal, 10, 2, 1-7
dc.titleE-learning or e-lemmings? Who pipes the tune?
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess


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