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dc.contributor.authorClear, Tony
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-27T22:14:23Z
dc.date.available2009-05-27T22:14:23Z
dc.date.copyright2003
dc.date.created2003
dc.date.issued2009-05-27T22:14:23Z
dc.identifier.citationIn Newsletter ACM SIGCSE Bulletin. Volume 35 (2), June 2003, pp. 12-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/555
dc.description.abstractI have written previously about the need for students to develop discrimination as part of their preparation for professional practice during their undergraduate capstone courses. But nowhere is this need for discrimination more problematic than in the area of software documentation. Perhaps the only consolation is that professional developers are equally challenged. Yet in migrating students from the set of beliefs and practices that may have worked for them in programming-in-the-small, to those required for programming-in-the-large, sound documentation practices are critical to effective development and delivery of a professional product.
dc.publisherACM
dc.rights© ACM, 2003. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution.
dc.sourceACM SIGCSE Bulletin - Inroads, 35, 2, 12-13
dc.titleDocumentation and agile methods: striking a balance
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.identifier.doi10.1145/782941.782949


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