Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLicorish, SA
dc.contributor.authorMacDonell, SG
dc.contributor.editorSilva, FQBD
dc.contributor.editorJuzgado, NJ
dc.contributor.editorTravassos, GH
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-24T07:22:24Z
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-24T23:45:30Z
dc.date.available2013-06-24T07:22:24Z
dc.date.available2013-06-24T23:45:30Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.date.issued2013-06-24
dc.identifier.citationIn EASE '13 Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Evaluation and Assessment in Software Engineering. Pp. 228-239
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4503-1848-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/5500
dc.description.abstractContext: Interest in software engineering (SE) methodologies and tools has been complemented in recent years by research efforts oriented towards understanding the human processes involved in software development. This shift has been imperative given reports of inadequately performing teams and the consequent growing emphasis on individuals and team relations in contemporary SE methods. Objective: While software repositories have frequently been studied with a view to explaining such human processes, research has tended to use primarily quantitative analysis approaches. There is concern, however, that such approaches can provide only a partial picture of the software process. Given the way human behavior is nuanced within psychological and social contexts, it has been asserted that a full understanding may only be achieved through deeper contextual enquiries. Method: We have followed such an approach and have applied data mining, SNA, psycholinguistic analysis and directed content analysis (CA) to study the way core developers at IBM Rational Jazz contribute their social and intellectual capital, and have compared the attitudes, interactions and activities of these members to those of their less active counterparts. Results: Among our results, we uncovered that Jazz's core developers worked across multiple roles, and were crucial to their teams' organizational, intra-personal and interpersonal processes. Additionally, although these individuals were highly task- and achievement-focused, they were also largely responsible for maintaining positive team atmosphere. Further, we uncovered that, as a group, Jazz developers spent a large amount of time providing context awareness in support of their colleagues. Conclusion: Our results suggest that high-performing distributed agile teams rely on both individual and collective efforts, as well as organizational environments that promote informal and organic work structures.
dc.publisherACM
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/5496
dc.relation.replaces10292/5496
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2460999.2461034
dc.rights© ACM, 2013. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in PUBLICATION (see Citation), (see Publisher’s Version).
dc.subjectSoftware development
dc.subjectCore developers
dc.subjectRoles
dc.subjectPsycholinguistics
dc.subjectContent analysis
dc.subjectBahaviour
dc.subjectJazz
dc.titleThe true role of active communicators: an empirical study of Jazz core developers
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.identifier.doi10.1145/2460999.2461034
aut.conference.typePaper Published in Proceedings
aut.relation.endpage239
aut.relation.startpage228
pubs.elements-id142257


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record