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dc.contributor.authorMowbray, D
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-06T01:25:10Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-10T21:10:00Z
dc.date.available2012-12-06T01:25:10Z
dc.date.available2012-12-10T21:10:00Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.date.issued2012-12-06
dc.identifier.citationXLVII Asamblea Annual Cladea 2012 Conference held at The Westin Lima, Hotel & Convention Center, Lima, Peru, 2012-10-22 to 2012-10-24, published in: Management Education: Beyond Boundaries
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/4835
dc.description.abstractAs the effects of the global financial crisis upon organisational performance become increasingly evident and with some commentators implicating corporate governance in respect of corporate casualties, it is clear that a fresh approach is needed to understand the extent of influence that boards may have on their companies. This study proposes and confirms that a board's influence is facilitated through interactions with the executives in a relational space we have termed the “third team”. To address this proposition, a survey of board and executive members of for-profit and not-for-profit organisations was conducted, followed by semi-structured interviews with a selection of participants. In exploring the interactions between the board and the executive, the study focused on the mix of characteristics in order to uncover the extent of this combined “team's” influence on organisational performance. The paper draws support for this model and the concept of shared leadership - an important element within the third team - from various authors (e.g. Drucker, 1989, 1990, Kozlowski & Bell, 2003, Pearce & Conger, 2003, Trecker, 1971, Vandewaerde, Voordeckers, Lambrechts, & Bammens, 2011). Shared leadership does not equate with equality; it does, however, highlight the conceptualisation of the combined board-executive as a team with a degree of shared leadership and responsibility for organisational performance.
dc.publisherThe Latin American Council of Management School (CLADEA)
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/4825
dc.relation.replaces10292/4825
dc.relation.urihttp://cladea.org/proceedings2012/visor/view/resumen.php?id=1&id0=17&id1=2
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in (see Citation). The original publication is available at (see Publisher's Version)
dc.subjectBoard
dc.subjectTeam
dc.subjectPerformance
dc.titleHow boards influence organisational performance
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
aut.conference.typePaper Published in Proceedings
pubs.elements-id132476


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