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dc.contributor.authorBaker, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorBenson, SJ
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-05T03:14:13Z
dc.date.available2012-06-05T03:14:13Z
dc.date.copyright2008
dc.date.issued2012-06-05
dc.identifier.citationPacific Journalism Review, vol.14(2), pp.183 - 204
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/4316
dc.description.abstractIn 2005 and 2007, two high profile crimes were reported in the New Zealand media. The first case involved the murder of a young Chinese student, Wan Biao, whose dismembered body was discovered in a suitcase. The second case involved domestic violence in which a Chinese man murdered his wife and fled the scene with their young daughter - who the press later dubbed 'Pumpkin' when she was found abandoned in Melbourne, Australia. The authors discuss how news and current affairs programmes decontextualise 'Asian' stories to portray a clear divide between the 'New Zealand' public and the separate 'Asian other'. Asians are portrayed as a homogenous group and the media fails to distinguish between Asians as victims of crimes as a separate category to Asians as perpetrators of crimes. This may have consequences for the New Zealand Asian communities and the wider New Zealand society as a whole.
dc.publisherPacific Media Centre
dc.relation.urihttp://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=489016051694490;res=IELNZC
dc.rights2007–2012 Pacific Media Centre. Pacific Media Centre is part of the Creative Industries Research Institute, AUT University.
dc.titleThe suitcase, the samurai sword and the pumpkin: Asian crime and news media treatment
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dark.contributor.authorBaker, S
dark.contributor.authorBenson, SJ
aut.relation.endpage204
aut.relation.issue2
aut.relation.startpage183
aut.relation.volume14


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