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dc.contributor.authorGaziulusoy, I
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, C
dc.contributor.authorMcDowall, R
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-11T04:07:58Z
dc.date.available2012-04-11T04:07:58Z
dc.date.copyright2010-12
dc.date.issued2012-04-11
dc.identifier.citation4th International Conference on Sustainability Engineering and Science: Transitions to Sustainability, Auckland, New Zealand, 2010-11-30 - 2010-12-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/3700
dc.description.abstractIt is now commonly accepted that, in order to achieve sustainability, we need societal transformation, which requires institutional, social/cultural, organisational as well as technological change. This type of massive societal transformation in which all aspects of society are expected to co-evolve towards and align with sustainability goals is defined as sustainability transition or system innovation for sustainability. One of the major actors in system innovation is industry. Nevertheless, neither the theory nor the operational approaches currently based on this emerging theory address how to link macro-level innovation (i.e. institutional and social-cultural innovation) to the micro-level innovation (i.e. product/service and technology innovation). This paper presents the results of a recently completed Ph.D. study. The overall objective of this study was to effectively link the activities/decisions at product development (micro-innovation) level in companies with the transformation which needs to take place at the societal (macro-innovation) level to achieve sustainability. The research took place in three distinguishable phases. In the first phase a broad literature review was carried out covering areas of sustainability science, futures studies and system innovation theory. In the second phase, a theory of system innovation at product development level was developed based on the findings and insights gathered from the review of the literature. This theory was used to develop a scenario method to help product development teams in planning for system innovation for sustainability. During this phase a workshop tool was also developed as the operational component of the scenario method. The third phase consisted of a field work carried out to test, improve and evaluate the scenario method using an action research methodology. The detailed evaluation of the effectiveness of the scenario method as a futures work and the potential of it to aid in system innovation for sustainability provided supportive evidence for the claim that the scenario method is a valuable and a viable method.
dc.format.mediumOnline and Hard Drive
dc.publisherNew Zealand Society for Sustainability Engineering and Science
dc.relation.urihttp://www.thesustainabilitysociety.org.nz/conference-archives/2010-conference/manuscripts/
dc.rightsThe Sustainability Society allows you to use the electronic information provided on this web site free of charge. The Sustainability Society retains copyright over all electronic information where no author is listed or where one or more authors are listed but are acting in their capacity as representatives of The Sustainability Society, for example the Secretary or Chairperson of The Sustainability Society. In cases where electronic information is authored by one or more named parties who do not represent The Sustainability Society, these parties retain copyright over their own work and grant The Sustainability Society a non-exclusive, non-transferable license to make their work available online. All electronic information provided on this web site is intended for your own personal use and you may not distribute it without the permission of the respective author(s).
dc.subjectSystem innovation for sustainability
dc.subjectAction research
dc.titleSystem innovation for sustainability at product development level: a scenario method and a workshop process
dc.typeConference Contribution
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess


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