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dc.contributor.authorKing, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHume, PAen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorClark, Ten_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-26T04:04:03Z
dc.date.available2022-05-26T04:04:03Z
dc.date.copyright2010en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationNew Zealand Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol 37-2, pp. 56-68.
dc.identifier.issn0110-6384en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/15165
dc.description.abstractObjective: To assess rugby league team management, administrators and officials’ knowledge of first-aid, concussion recognition and management and injury prevention. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted using a first-aid and concussion knowledge questionnaire consisting of two parts: (1) Thirty six multi-choice questions on first-aid assessment and knowledge incorporating five constructs (injury prevention, identification and management, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and wound care) and, (2) Thirty eight closed- and open-ended questions on concussion recognition, management and prevention knowledge. Results: Ninety five people from the Wellington district rugby league community completed the questionnaire. Fifty two (55%) of respondents had a current up-to-date first-aid certificate which included cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Only two (2%) participants achieved the 80% passing score in the first-aid and concussion knowledge questionnaire. The mean ±SD percentages for the first-aid knowledge questions was 56 ±13% and for the 16 symptom recognition of concussion questions was 33 ±14%. Overall sports-related concussion knowledge was low (42 ±20%). Loss of consciousness was reported to be incorrectly required for a concussion to have occurred by 39% of respondents. Nearly half the respondents identified that all concussions recover at the same rate. All referees had a refereeing qualification while only 24% of coaches, 7% of managers and 2% of trainer/medics had a rugby league specific qualification. Conclusion: The first-aid and concussion knowledge results highlighted a lower understanding of sports-related first-aid and concussion than previously reported. Injury prevention and care programs in rugby league at the amateur level in New Zealand should stress first-aid and concussion injury knowledge management to enable knowledge empowerment.
dc.publisherSports Medicine New Zealand
dc.relation.urihttp://sportsmedicine.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/NZJSM-Vol-37-Issue-2.pdfen_NZ
dc.rights© 2010 Sports Medicine New Zealand. The NZJSM is copy-righted by Sports Medicine New Zealand Inc. No portion(s) of the work(s) may be reproduced without written consent from the publisher. Permission to reproduce copies of articles for non commercial use may be obtained from Sports Medicine New Zealand Inc, PO Box 6398, Dunedin, New Zealand, email admin@sportsmedicine.co.nz
dc.titleFirst-aid and Concussion Knowledge of Rugby League Team Management, Administrators and Officials in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.roid17136en_NZ
aut.relation.endpage69
aut.relation.issue2en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage56
aut.relation.volume37en_NZ
pubs.elements-id13604
aut.relation.journalNew Zealand Journal of Sports Medicineen_NZ


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