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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorReddy, Pen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWakeling, Len_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMani, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBenveniste, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNaiker, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Sen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-12T03:13:23Z
dc.date.available2022-05-12T03:13:23Z
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Education, 7:873571. doi: 10.3389/feduc.2022.873571
dc.identifier.issn2504-284Xen_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/15127
dc.description.abstractStudent attitude toward chemistry may influence engagement and achievement in chemistry-related courses, however, equivocal results in studies conducted in Western countries to date indicate this relationship requires further investigation. In this study, we investigated the correlation between attitude toward chemistry and achievement amongst a cohort of first-year undergraduate students from The University of the South Pacific (USP). A cluster analysis was used to identify low- and high-achieving groups of students to further explore potential correlations. There was a positive correlation between the cognitive and affective components of attitude among low-achieving students, but not among high-achieving students. The cognitive component of attitude did not appear to be strongly correlated with achievement in students from either group, although the affective component was positively correlated with achievement. The single item most strongly correlated with student achievement was their response on the Worthless-Beneficial scale. One of the notable findings was the differences in the attitude-achievement relationship between low-achieving and high-achieving students, suggesting that combining these clusters of students into a single group for analysis may obscure underlying correlations. Chemistry educators should continue to target their teaching styles to cater to different learning styles and achievement levels of students, including cognitive and non-cognitive learning styles.en_NZ
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/feduc.2022.873571/full
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 Johnson, Reddy, Sharma, Wakeling, Mani, Benveniste, Naiker and Brown. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.subjectFirst-year undergraduates; Chemistry education; Attitude; Achievement; Cluster analysis
dc.titleAttitude and Achievement of First-Year Chemistry Undergraduate Students at The University of the South Pacificen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/feduc.2022.873571en_NZ
aut.relation.volume7en_NZ
pubs.elements-id454368
aut.relation.journalFrontiers in Educationen_NZ


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