Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMilne, Jen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-03T02:12:35Z
dc.date.available2022-05-03T02:12:35Z
dc.date.copyright2021en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationSN Social Sciences, 1(2), 48. https://doi.org/10.1007/s43545-020-00054-w
dc.identifier.issn2662-9283en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/15110
dc.description.abstractThis article reports on the findings from a study that intended to consider the validity of a model of reading comprehension. In the process of coding the resulting verbal protocols, the ‘feel’ or experience of the actual readers was lost, as was the individuality of the participants. Narratives were then developed to describe the experience of the reading and to recapture that individual nature of each reader’s approach to making sense of the texts they read. After those narratives were developed, some patterns emerged that are discussed in this article as reading styles. Some of these styles resulted in the reader developing a good understanding of what they were reading and others did not. The successful styles were classified in two ways, by the main strategy used and by the deliberateness of the readers’ construction of understanding. There are two pairs of successful reading styles discussed here, making four successful styles in total. Readers using a visualisation strategy are described as either “movie makers” for those who consciously constructed their mental movies, and as “Movie watchers” for those who experienced the process as being more receptive. The other strategy used in successful reading was questioning, either as an active “Hunter-seeker” approach or in the less-active “Wondering” style. Three styles that were not associated with successful reading are also described. Some implications for future research, and for teaching and learning are also discussed.
dc.languageenen_NZ
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s43545-020-00054-w#article-info
dc.rightsAn author may self-archive an author-created version of his/her article on his/her own website and or in his/her institutional repository. He/she may also deposit this version on his/her funder’s or funder’s designated repository at the funder’s request or as a result of a legal obligation, provided it is not made publicly available until 12 months after official publication. He/ she may not use the publisher's PDF version, which is posted on www.springerlink.com, for the purpose of self-archiving or deposit. Furthermore, the author may only post his/her version provided acknowledgement is given to the original source of publication and a link is inserted to the published article on Springer's website. The link must be accompanied by the following text: "The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com”. (Please also see Publisher’s Version and Citation).
dc.subjectReading comprehension; Narrative; Reading style; Reading strategy; Metacognition
dc.titleIndividual Reading Styles: A Narrative Approach to Understanding Reading Behaviouren_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s43545-020-00054-wen_NZ
aut.relation.articlenumber48en_NZ
aut.relation.issue2en_NZ
aut.relation.volume1en_NZ
pubs.elements-id397582
aut.relation.journalSN Social Sciencesen_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record