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dc.contributor.advisorCollens, Paula
dc.contributor.authorChandra, Madhu
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-21T00:53:22Z
dc.date.available2022-02-21T00:53:22Z
dc.date.copyright2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14928
dc.description.abstractIn relational and other humanistic psychotherapies, empathy is an integral part of the therapeutic relationship. Through the experience of empathy, clients gain insight into conscious and unconscious processes regarding self-perception, behaviours, and ways of relating with others. Therapists’ provision of empathy strengthens the therapeutic relationship, building trust and improving positive outcomes for clients. Studies in human behaviour show that empathy is easier with people who share similar cultural beliefs, values, and worldviews. This hermeneutic literature review explores how therapists’ cultural identities and worldview may affect the provision of empathy when working with clients from cultures with different worldviews. The findings show that empathy is defined, understood, and expressed differently across cultures and from differing worldview perspectives. Therapists are encouraged to understand their own cultural identities and worldview and to reflect on how this may affect their provision of empathy in clinical practice.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectEmpathyen_NZ
dc.subjectCross-culturalen_NZ
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen_NZ
dc.subjectWorldviewen_NZ
dc.subjectCultureen_NZ
dc.titleProvision of Empathy: Challenges Experienced by Psychotherapists in Cross-Cultural Dyadsen_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Dissertations
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Psychotherapyen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2022-02-21T00:20:35Z


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