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dc.contributor.authorTakamori, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHamlin, MJen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKing, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHume, PAen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTachikawa, Ken_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKoyanagi, Ren_NZ
dc.contributor.authorYoshida, Ten_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T02:41:42Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T02:41:42Z
dc.date.copyright2022en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Sports Medicine Published Online First: 18 January 2022. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2021-104868
dc.identifier.issn0306-3674en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1473-0480en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14871
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: RugbySmart is a safe tackle technique education programme. Our objective was to identify whether the RugbySmart-recommended safe tackle technique was exhibited by club rugby players and whether tackle-related injuries showed poor tackle technique characteristics. METHODS: The prospective cohort design enabled 28 senior club based amateur male rugby union players from New Zealand to be followed over 18 matches in the 2017 rugby season. Game video analysis by three analysts provided categorisation of tackle technique into type, approach, foot contact, leading foot and rear foot position, face and head position. Injuries were diagnosed by the same sports medicine physician. RESULTS: In the 18 matches, 28 players completed a combined total of 3006 tackles, with only six tackle-related injuries sustained. Notable findings included: (1) forwards complete more tackles than backs; (2) shoulder tackles were the most prevalent tackle; (3) good tackle technique as promoted by RugbySmart was demonstrated in 57.9% of all tackles and (4) of the six tackle-related injuries, two occurred despite RugbySmart desired tackle techniques. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to investigate whether players were performing the recommended 'safe tackle technique' proposed by New Zealand Rugby's RugbySmart programme. As two of six tackle-related injuries occurred despite the RugbySmart preferred technique being performed, further technique analysis and a larger sample are needed to determine what techniques reduce risk of injury during tackles. As only 57.9% of tackles were performed with RugbySmart head and foot positions, further research and education regarding tackle technique recommendations are needed.en_NZ
dc.languageengen_NZ
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2022/01/17/bjsports-2021-104868
dc.rights© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2022. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
dc.subjectBrain concussionen_NZ
dc.subjectMaleen_NZ
dc.subjectPreventive medicineen_NZ
dc.subjectRugbyen_NZ
dc.subjectSporting injuriesen_NZ
dc.titleProfiling the Tackle and Its Injury Characteristics in Premier New Zealand Club Rugby Union Players Over a Complete Seasonen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjsports-2021-104868en_NZ
pubs.elements-id447804
aut.relation.journalBritish Journal of Sports Medicineen_NZ


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