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dc.contributor.authorChaalali, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBouriel, Ken_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRouissi, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorChtara, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMkaouer, Ben_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCronin, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorChaouachi, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorChamari, Ken_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-22T23:22:47Z
dc.date.available2021-11-22T23:22:47Z
dc.identifier.citationBiology of Sport. 2022; 39 (2): 379–387. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5114/biolsport.2022.103574
dc.identifier.issn0860-021Xen_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14706
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the effects of non-resisted (NRS) and partner-towing resisted (RS) sprint training on legs explosive force, sprint performance and sprint kinematic parameters. Sixteen young elite soccer players (age 16.6 ± 0.2 years, height 175.6 ± 5.7 cm, and body mass 67.6 ± 8.2 kg) were randomly allocated to two training groups: resisted sprint RS (n = 7) and non-resisted sprint NRS (n = 9). The RS group followed a six-week sprint training programme consisting of two “sprint training sessions” per week in addition to their usual soccer training. The NRS group followed a similar sprint training programme, replicating the distances of sprints but without any added resistance. All players were assessed before and after training: vertical and horizontal jumping (countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), and 5-jump test (5JT)), 30 m sprint performance (5, 10, and 20 m split times), and running kinematics (stride length and frequency). In the RS group significant (p < 0.05) changes were: decreased sprint time for 0–5 m, 0–10 m and 0–30 m (-6.31, -5.73 and -2.00%; effect size (ES) = 0.70, 1.00 and 0.41, respectively); higher peak jumping height (4.23% and 3.59%; ES = 0.35 and 0.37, for SJ and CMJ respectively); and 5JT (3.10%; ES = 0.44); and increased stride frequency (3.96%; ES = 0.76). In the NRS group, significant (p < 0.05) changes were: decreased sprint time at 0–30 m (-1.34%, ES = 0.33) and increased stride length (1.21%; ES = 0.17). RS training (partner towing) for six weeks in young soccer players showed more effective performances in sprint, stride frequency and lower-limb explosive force, while NRS training improved sprint performance at 0–30 m and stride length. Consequently, coaches and physical trainers should consider including RS training as part of their sprint training to ensure optimal sprint performance.
dc.publisherTermedia Sp. z.o.o.en_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.termedia.pl/Resisted-sprint-training-with-partner-towing-improves-explosive-force-and-sprint-performance-in-young-soccer-players-a-pilot-study,78,43285,0,1.html
dc.rights© Institute of Sport – National Research Instutite. All articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/), allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.
dc.subjectSprint harness; Sprint acceleration; Strength training; Stride length; Stride frequency
dc.titleResisted Sprint Training With Partner Towing Improves Explosive Force and Sprint Performance in Young Soccer Players- a Pilot Studyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.5114/biolsport.2022.103574en_NZ
pubs.elements-id444157
aut.relation.journalBiology of Sporten_NZ


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