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dc.contributor.authorShaikh, Nen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTheadom, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSiegert, Ren_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHardaker, Nen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKing, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHume, Pen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T03:28:46Z
dc.date.available2021-10-05T03:28:46Z
dc.date.copyright2021-12en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBMC Neurology 21, 376 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12883-021-02410-6
dc.identifier.issn1471-2377en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14549
dc.description.abstractObjective To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Brain Injury Screening Tool (BIST) symptom scale in a sample of people with a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) through Rasch analysis, and to obtain an interval level measurement score for potential clinical use. Materials and methods Data were obtained from 114 adults aged over 16 years, who had experienced at least one mTBI in the past 10 years. Participants were recruited via social media, concussion clinics and sports organisations over a 4-month period between May and September 2020. Participants were asked to compete the symptom scale of the BIST tool via an anonymous online questionnaire. Internal construct validity, dimensionality, person separation index, and differential item functioning of the BIST were examined with Rasch analysis. Results BIST in its original form produced a satisfactory item-trait interaction, and good reliability, but was found to be multi-dimensional. Rasch analysis of the full scale with three domains as subtests resulted in acceptable model fit (χ2(6) =3.8, p >  0.05), with good reliability (Person Separation Index = 0.84), and uni-dimensionality. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) analysis displayed no significant DIF effects for sex or age revealing that people responded consistently and similarly to the individual BIST items based on severity of symptom burden. Conclusions The 15-item symptom scale of the BIST tool is a psychometrically sound measure of symptom burden following mTBI. The findings provide support for use of both total and sub scale scores for clinical use. Ordinal to interval score conversions are recommended for use when using the scores for research purposes in mTBI.en_NZ
dc.languageenen_NZ
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12883-021-02410-6
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2021. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativeco mmons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data
dc.subjectBrain injury; Concussion; TBI; Screening; Assessment; Measurement; Rasch analysis
dc.titleRasch Analysis of the Brain Injury Screening Tool (BIST) in Mild Traumatic Brain Injuryen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12883-021-02410-6en_NZ
aut.relation.articlenumber376en_NZ
aut.relation.issue1en_NZ
aut.relation.volume21en_NZ
pubs.elements-id440942
aut.relation.journalBMC Neurologyen_NZ


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