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dc.contributor.advisorIngs, Welby
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Christopher Huia
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-18T01:12:55Z
dc.date.available2008-04-18T01:12:55Z
dc.date.copyright2008-01-24
dc.date.issued2008-01-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/144
dc.description.abstractThe research is specifically concerned with the notion of the military masque as a projected extension of the history of masqueing behaviour evident in gay men's attire.The creative outcome of the project is a collection of five interchangeable masques, an animated poetic work and a series of photographic images.This exegesis therefore, seeks to contextualise the created artifacts. In doing this it posits a historical and critical framework that considers the hyper-masculine1 and its relationship to gay men's masqueing.21 In this exegesis hyper masculinity is taken to mean an exaggeration of stereotypical male beliefs and behaviors through an emphasis on virility, strength and aggression and dress codification.2 Frye (1957), in his Anatomy of criticism offers a useful definition of masque as I frame it in this thesis. The term may be understood as "a species of drama in which spectacle plays an important role and in which the characters tend to be, or become aspects of human personality, rather than independent characters" (pp. 365-7). In this respect the masque is something donned that presents a decodable identity extra to, or other than the actual personality of the wearer.
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectMilitary
dc.subjectMasque
dc.subjectHyper-masculine
dc.subjectHomosexuality, Gay
dc.subjectMale
dc.titleMasqueulinities
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts in Art and Design
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool of Art & Designen_US
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess


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