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dc.contributor.authorTheadom, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorReid, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHardaker, Nen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLough, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHume, PAen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-01T04:18:13Z
dc.date.available2021-09-01T04:18:13Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 23 (2020), 1055–1061
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1878-1861en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14467
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine knowledge, attitudes and behaviour towards concussion in adult equestrian athletes. Design: Nationwide, cross-sectional, questionnaire. Methods: Participants were recruited via advertisements circulated through social media, community presentations and equestrian organisations. Participants were sent a web link to an online questionnaire previously designed for high school athletes and modified to ensure relevance to equestrian activities. The percentage of correct responses per item and a total knowledge score were calculated. Differences in concussion knowledge by age, sex, level of experience and previous history of concussion were explored using t-tests, 95% confidence intervals (CI) and effect sizes. Results: The questionnaire was completed by 1486 participants (Mean age = 39.1 ± 15.4). Knowledge of what concussion was, how to recognise it and key symptoms (except poor sleep) was high (>80%). In contrast, awareness of guidelines was moderate (56%) and inability of helmets to prevent concussion was low (12%). Significantly higher levels of knowledge of concussion were identified in females compared with males (t=-6.55 p < 0.001, 95%CI=-3.26 to -1.75). The majority (87%) of participants reported that a helmet should be replaced after a fall, yet 46% reported re-using a helmet following a hit to the head. Conclusions: Knowledge of and attitudes towards concussion were positive. However, there were knowledge gaps and discrepancies between some attitudes and behaviour on some aspects of concussion. Targeted campaigns to promote awareness of concussion and improve recognition and onward management are needed. Education related to equestrian activities such as helmet use and injury mechanisms is needed to change behaviour and minimise the risk of injury.en_NZ
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.urihttps://www.jsams.org/article/S1440-2440(19)30735-2/fulltext
dc.rights© 2020 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
dc.subjectBrain injuries; Head trauma; Education; Habits; Horses; Survey
dc.titleConcussion Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviour in Equestrian Athletesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsams.2020.05.008en_NZ
aut.relation.endpage1061
aut.relation.issue11en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage1055
aut.relation.volume23en_NZ
pubs.elements-id375195
aut.relation.journalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sporten_NZ


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