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dc.contributor.authorRothschild, JAen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKilding, AEen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBroome, SCen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCronin, JBen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPlews, DJen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-07T23:58:20Z
dc.date.available2021-06-07T23:58:20Z
dc.date.copyright2021en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationNutrients, 13(4), 1291. doi:10.3390/nu13041291
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14248
dc.description.abstractNutritional intake can influence exercise metabolism and performance, but there is a lack of research comparing protein-rich pre-exercise meals with endurance exercise performed both in the fasted state and following a carbohydrate-rich breakfast. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of three pre-exercise nutrition strategies on metabolism and exercise capacity during cycling. On three occasions, seventeen trained male cyclists (VO2peak 62.2 ± 5.8 mL·kg−1·min−1, 31.2 ± 12.4 years, 74.8 ± 9.6 kg) performed twenty minutes of submaximal cycling (4 × 5 min stages at 60%, 80%, and 100% of ventilatory threshold (VT), and 20% of the difference between power at the VT and peak power), followed by 3 × 3 min intervals at 80% peak aerobic power and 3 × 3 min intervals at maximal effort, 30 min after consuming a carbohydrate-rich meal (CARB; 1 g/kg CHO), a protein-rich meal (PROTEIN; 0.45 g/kg protein + 0.24 g/kg fat), or water (FASTED), in a randomized and counter-balanced order. Fat oxidation was lower for CARB compared with FASTED at and below the VT, and compared with PROTEIN at 60% VT. There were no differences between trials for average power during high-intensity intervals (367 ± 51 W, p = 0.516). Oxidative stress (F2-Isoprostanes), perceived exertion, and hunger were not different between trials. Overall, exercising in the overnight-fasted state increased fat oxidation during submaximal exercise compared with exercise following a CHO-rich breakfast, and pre-exercise protein ingestion allowed similarly high levels of fat oxidation. There were no differences in perceived exertion, hunger, or performance, and we provide novel data showing no influence of pre-exercise nutrition ingestion on exercise-induced oxidative stress.en_NZ
dc.languageenen_NZ
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/4/1291
dc.rights© 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/ 4.0/).
dc.subjectNutrition; Exercise; Fat oxidation; Oxidative stress; Isoprostanes
dc.titlePre-exercise Carbohydrate or Protein Ingestion Influences Substrate Oxidation but Not Performance or Hunger Compared With Cycling in the Fasted Stateen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/nu13041291en_NZ
aut.relation.articlenumber1291en_NZ
aut.relation.issue4en_NZ
aut.relation.volume13en_NZ
pubs.elements-id400243
aut.relation.journalNutrientsen_NZ


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