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dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRush, Een_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCrook, Nen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-03T23:38:46Z
dc.date.available2021-06-03T23:38:46Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health Nutrition, Volume 11, Issue 12, December 2008, pp. 1318 - 1325, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980008002711
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14240
dc.description.abstractObjective The progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)/impaired fasting glucose (IFG) to type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed through intensive lifestyle changes. How to translate this to implementation across whole communities remains unclear. We now describe the results to a pilot of a personal trainer (Maori Community Health Worker, MCHW) approach among Maori in New Zealand. Design, setting and subjects A randomised cluster-controlled trial of intensive lifestyle change was commenced among 5240 non-pregnant Maori family members without diabetes from 106 rural and 106 urban geographical clusters. Baseline assessments included lifestyle questionnaires, anthropometric measurements and venesection. A pilot study (Vanguard Study) cohort of 160 participants were weighed before and during MCHW intervention, and compared with fifty-two participants weighed immediately before intervention and with 1143 participants from the same geographical area. Interactions between participants and the MCHW were reported using personal digital assistants with a programmed detailed structured approach to each interview. Results During the Vanguard Study, participants and MCHW found the messages, toolkit and delivery approach acceptable. Those with IGT/IFG diagnosed (n 27) experienced significant weight loss after screening and during the Vanguard Study (5·2 (sd 6·6) kg, paired t test P < 0·01). Significant weight loss occurred during the Vanguard Study among all participants (−1·3 (sd 3·6) kg, P < 0·001). Conclusions Comparable initial weight loss was shown among those with IGT/IFG and those from existing trials. Community-wide prevention programmes are feasible among Maori and are likely to result in significant reductions in the incidence of diabetes.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.relation.urihttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/public-health-nutrition/article/development-and-piloting-of-a-community-health-workerbased-intervention-for-the-prevention-of-diabetes-among-new-zealand-maori-in-te-wai-o-rona-diabetes-prevention-strategy/9E0F974120E72D463E2F5BD8B49CA2C1#
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors 2008
dc.subjectType 2 diabetes; Prevention; Diet; Lifestyle; Community
dc.titleDevelopment and Piloting of a Community Health Worker-based Intervention for the Prevention of Diabetes Among New Zealand Māori in Te Wai O Rona: Diabetes Prevention Strategyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1368980008002711en_NZ
dc.identifier.roid4554en_NZ
aut.relation.issue12en_NZ
aut.relation.volume11en_NZ
pubs.elements-id14950
aut.relation.journalPublic Health Nutritionen_NZ


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