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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMoloney, Een_NZ
dc.contributor.authorParr, JMen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAspinall, Cen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSlark, Jen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-02T04:06:27Z
dc.date.available2021-06-02T04:06:27Z
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Nursing. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.15859
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1365-2702en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14232
dc.description.abstractAims and objectives Identify the key concepts, principles and values embedded within Indigenous Māori models of health and wellbeing; and determine how these could inform the development of a Māori-centred relational model of care. Background Improving health equity for Māori, similar to other colonised Indigenous peoples globally, requires urgent attention. Improving the quality of health practitioners’ engagement with Indigenous Māori accessing health services is one area that could support improving Māori health equity. While the Fundamentals of Care framework offers a promising relational approach, it lacks consideration of culture, whānau or family, and spirituality, important for Indigenous health and wellbeing. Design and methods A qualitative literature review on Māori models of health and wellbeing yielded nine models to inform a Māori-centred relational model of care. We followed the PRISMA guidelines for reporting literature reviews. Results Four overarching themes were identified that included dimensions of health and wellbeing; whanaungatanga (connectedness); whakawhanaungatanga (building relationships); and socio-political health context (colonisation, urbanisation, racism, and marginalisation). Health and wellbeing for Māori is a holistic and relational concept. Building relationships that include whānau (extended family) is a cultural imperative. Conclusions This study highlights the importance and relevance of relational approaches to engaging Māori and their whānau accessing health services. It signals the necessary foundations for health practitioners to build trust-based relationships with Māori. Key elements for a Māori-centred model of relational care include whakawhanaungatanga (the process of building relationships) using tikanga (cultural protocols and processes) informed by cultural values of aroha (compassion and empathy), manaakitanga (kindness and hospitality), mauri (binding energy), wairua (importance of spiritual wellbeing). Relevance to clinical practice Culturally-based models of health and wellbeing provide indicators of important cultural values, concepts and practices and processes. These can then inform the development of a Māori-centred relational model of care to address inequity.
dc.languageenen_NZ
dc.publisherWileyen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jocn.15859
dc.rights© The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.subjectCultural competency; Cultural safety; Fundamental care; Indigenous; Literature review; Nursepatient relationship
dc.titleCreating an Indigenous Māori‐centred Model of Relational Health: A Literature Review of Māori Models of Healthen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jocn.15859en_NZ
aut.relation.articlenumberjocn.15859en_NZ
pubs.elements-id430962
aut.relation.journalJournal of Clinical Nursingen_NZ


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