Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHaar, Jarrod
dc.contributor.authorKaushal, Raghuvansh
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-25T01:34:24Z
dc.date.available2021-05-25T01:34:24Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14210
dc.description.abstractGiven the global prevalence of Covid-19, there is a large gap around our understanding of how firms and their employees operate in such times. The present study sought to understand what firm factors shaped the way firms support working from home and their effects on employee job satisfaction. The present study extends our understanding of Covid-19 conditions in New Zealand by exploring servant leadership and psychosocial safety climate as predictors of organisational support for working from home. Next, these factors predict work-life balance and job satisfaction, with work-life balance expecting to mediate the influence of leadership and climate. Finally, organisational support for working from home is included as a moderator, and combined, moderated mediation models are run. This is tested using a sample of 400 New Zealand employees across the lockdown period of April 2020. The findings show that servant leadership and psychosocial safety climate are both positively related to organisational support for working from home. Next, servant leadership and psychosocial safety climate are both positively related to work-life balance and job satisfaction, and work-life balance partially mediates the influence of leadership and climate on job satisfaction. Significant interaction effects from organisational support for working from home shows that firms providing better support for employees working from home reacted more positively to positive leadership and climate. Similarly, the significant moderated mediation effect showed the indirect effect of servant leadership, and psychosocial safety climate both strengthened as organisational support for working from home improved, indicating organisational support for working from home acted as a boundary condition. The implications for organisations and human resource managers are discussed.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectServant leadershipen_NZ
dc.subjectPsychosocial safety climateen_NZ
dc.subjectOrganisational support for working from homeen_NZ
dc.subjectWork-life balanceen_NZ
dc.subjectJob satisfactionen_NZ
dc.subjectModerated-mediationen_NZ
dc.titleCOVID-19 and Remote Work: Experiences of Workers in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Dissertations
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Businessen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2021-05-25T00:05:35Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record