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dc.contributor.advisorCleveland, Donna
dc.contributor.advisorJoseph, Frances
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Colin
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T23:28:19Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T23:28:19Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14208
dc.description.abstractTechnology for the long-term monitoring of heart conditions in moving everyday environments has yet to be developed to a clinical standard for consumer users. This leaves a large gap in the ability to effectively diagnose certain heart conditions that present infrequently and outside of clinical settings. Increasingly, wearable technologies have developed to a point where they can begin to address this need. This research concerns the designs and fabrication of a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) device using electronic textiles for long term monitoring of heart conditions. The wearable device uses different configurations of e-textiles to serve as both electrodes for signal monitoring and conductive traces and pads for interconnecting hard and soft components. These materials were used for their ability to be integrated into clothing and offer dry sensing, in lieu of the gel electrodes used in hospital settings. Additionally, processes like vacuum forming, injection moulding and overmolding were used in conjunction with these materials to produce novel forms and offer new ways to integrate materials. This research involves a multifaceted approach to design that is framed by a larger narrative around wearable design considerations and the interdisciplinary challenges that relate to them. Practice is grounded by a research through design approach, a form of research also known as action research, that offers an appropriate methodology for practical and collaborative elements of the research. While the practice did not produce a fully functional wearable ECG system, it did generate several promising functional component prototypes that could be further explored and integrated. These included innovations like embossed e-textile electrodes with moulded silicone gripping elements, and machine knitted belts with integrated soft circuits and overmolded silicone/e-textiles electrodes. These innovations address several challenges and considerations elaborated in the research. The overarching interdisciplinary discussion considers both group and individual phases of the research. It suggests that, in this example and more generally, the tension between wearability and technical efficacy remains a stumbling point in the research and design space. Considerations around how wearable projects could be planned and actioned more effectively are offered in the form of explicit design processes guides that account for both the scientific method and creative process as it relates to wearables. Suggestions are made on how these models might develop further to account for the level at which e-textiles are being integrated.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectTextilesen_NZ
dc.subjectElectronic textilesen_NZ
dc.subjecte-textilesen_NZ
dc.subjectLines of non extensionen_NZ
dc.subjectMedical wearablesen_NZ
dc.subjectWearable designen_NZ
dc.subjectDesignen_NZ
dc.subjectPractice based researchen_NZ
dc.subjectInterdiscplinaryen_NZ
dc.subjectDesign methodsen_NZ
dc.titleWearable Biopotential Technologies: An Exploration of Textile Based Biopotential Sensing Electrodes for an ECG Wearable Deviceen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Creative Technologiesen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2021-05-24T07:00:36Z


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