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dc.contributor.authorRossouw, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGreyling, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSarracino, Fen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Ken_NZ
dc.contributor.authorPeroni, Cen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-09T22:46:16Z
dc.date.available2021-05-09T22:46:16Z
dc.date.copyright2021-05-04en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationGLO Discussion Paper. Retrieved from: https://www.econstor.eu/handle/10419/233601
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14171
dc.description.abstractIn this article we describe how well-being changed during 2020 in ten countries, namely Australia, Belgium, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Luxembourg, New Zealand, South Africa, and Spain. Our measure of well-being is the Gross National Happiness (GNH), a country-level index built applying sentiment analysis to data from Twitter. Our aim is to describe how GNH changed during the pandemic within countries, to assess its validity as a measure of well-being, and to analyse its correlates. We take advantage of a unique data-set made of daily observations about GNH, generalized trust and trust in national institutions, fear concerning the economy, loneliness, infection rate, policy stringency and distancing. To assess the validity of data sourced from Twitter, we exploit various sources of survey data, such as Eurobarometer and consumer satisfaction, and big data, such as Google Trends. Results indicate that sentiment analysis of Tweets an provide reliable and timely information on well-being. This can be particularly useful to timely inform decision-making.
dc.publisherEconStor - Global Labor Organization (GLO)en_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/233601/1/GLO-DP-0831.pdfen_NZ
dc.rightsEconStor supports Green Open Access. All papers on EconStor are made freely available without restrictions or embargo periods. Publication on EconStor is based on usage agreements with authors or the editors/publishers of a series or journal. Authors' copyrights are safeguarded. Publication on EconStor does not inhibit further publication of the documents in journals or on other document servers. Disseminating publications with EconStor is free for publishers and authors (FAQ).
dc.subjectHappiness; Covid-19; Big Data; Twitter; Sentiment Analysis; Well-being; Public policy; Trust; Fear; Loneliness
dc.titleA Year of Pandemic: Levels, Changes and Validity of Well-being Data From Twitter. Evidence From Ten Countriesen_NZ
dc.typeWorking paper
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
aut.relation.softwareversion831en_NZ
pubs.elements-id430127


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