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dc.contributor.advisorPacheco, Gail
dc.contributor.advisorErwin, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorTurcu, Alexandra
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-05T00:11:32Z
dc.date.available2021-05-05T00:11:32Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14166
dc.description.abstractProblem gambling is a significant public health concern, affecting approximately 11 percent of New Zealanders each year (Department of Internal Affairs, 2008). Class 4 gambling, defined as non-casino electronic gaming machines and commonly referred to as “pokies”, contributes the most harm to New Zealand compared to other types of gambling (Ministry of Health, 2019). We focus on the direct impact of local government policy instruments on the number of electronic gaming machines, venues, and gambling expenditure. Our key finding is that a reduction in access to Class 4 gambling is estimated to reduce gambling expenditure from electronic gaming machines by between 10 and 14 percent, relative to the reference group. Additionally, this research examines the indirect effects of territorial authority policies on crime. We focus specifically on addiction-related crimes involving alcohol and drugs. We find no significant impacts of gambling policies on this narrow subset of criminal offences.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectSinking liden_NZ
dc.subjectProblem gamblingen_NZ
dc.subjectElectronic gaming machinesen_NZ
dc.subjectHarm reductionen_NZ
dc.titleElectronic Gambling Machines in New Zealand: A Local Government Policy Analysisen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Businessen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2021-05-04T19:50:35Z


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