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dc.contributor.authorCrowther, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMaude, Ren_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBradford, Ben_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAustin, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGilkison, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMcAra-Couper, Jen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKrisjanous, Jen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-12T20:30:53Z
dc.date.available2021-04-12T20:30:53Z
dc.date.copyright2021en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Sociology. 6:614017. doi: 10.3389/fsoc.2021.614017
dc.identifier.issn2297-7775en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2297-7775en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14115
dc.description.abstractNew Zealand’s response to COVID-19 was go hard and go early into Level 4 lockdown on 25 March 2020. This rapid response has resulted in low rates of infection and deaths. For New Zealand midwives, the sudden changes to how they work with women and families during pregnancy, birth and postnatally, especially in the community, required unprecedented innovation and adaptation. The volume of information coming from many different sources, and the speed with which it was changing and updating, added further stress to the delivery of a midwifery model of care underpinned by partnership, collaboration, informed choice, safety and relational continuity. Despite the uncertainties, midwives continued their care for women and their families across all settings. In the rapidly changing landscape of the pandemic, news media provided a real time account of midwives’ and families’ challenges and experiences. This article provides background and discussion of these events and reports on a content analysis of media reporting the impact on the maternity system in New Zealand during the initial surge of the COVID-19 pandemic. We found that the New Zealand midwife was a major influencer and initiator for relational care to occur uninterrupted at the frontline throughout the COVID-19 lockdown, despite the personal risk. The initial 5-week lockdown in March 2020 involved stringent restrictions requiring all New Zealanders, other than essential workers such as midwives, to remain at home. Midwives kept women, their families and communities central to the conversation throughout lockdown whilst juggling their concerns about keeping themselves and their own families safe. Insights gained from the media analysis suggest that despite the significant stress and upheaval experienced by midwives and wāhine/women, relational continuity facilitates quality and consistent care that honors women’s choices and cultural needs even during situations of national crisis. then_NZ
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.
dc.relation.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fsoc.2021.614017/full
dc.rights© 2021 Crowther, Maude, Bradford, Austin, Gilkison, McAra-Couper and Krisjanous. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.subjectMidwives; New Zealand; COVID-19; Continuity of care; Lockdown; Choice; Media analysis; Community
dc.titleWhen Maintaining Relationships and Social Connectivity Matter: The Case of New Zealand Midwives and COVID-19en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fsoc.2021.614017en_NZ
aut.relation.volume6en_NZ
pubs.elements-id400086
aut.relation.journalFrontiers in Sociologyen_NZ


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