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dc.contributor.advisorMatthews, Justin
dc.contributor.advisorFrommherz, Gudrun
dc.contributor.authorTheunissen, Catherine A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-11T21:33:51Z
dc.date.available2021-04-11T21:33:51Z
dc.date.copyright2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/14111
dc.description.abstractDNA testing has increased exponentially, with direct-to-consumer tests becoming more available, accessible and cheaper. Increasingly, people take DNA tests to learn additional information about who they are and where they come from. However, until now, scholarship has paid limited attention to the potential effects of DNA testing on individuals’ identities. This study is one of the first to explore the potential implications and effects of DNA test results on individuals’ perceptions of their identity/identities. In this study, a thematic analysis is used to examine 16 semi-structured in-depth interviews with participants who have taken DNA tests. The participants were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling, and came from a range of age groups, genders, and ethnic backgrounds. The findings revealed that feelings of belonging to a group or place were particularly crucial to participants’ identities. Moreover, family identities were frequently challenged by DNA test results. Because DNA test results show individuals’ biogeographic ancestry, these results affected participants’ sense of feeling more, or less, connected to their perceived social groups. These feelings of belonging (or not) resulted in disturbances to their sense of self, which required participants to re-align their group and personal identities, including their family, biological, social, ethnic, cultural, national and religious identities. The study illustrates the importance participants attach to their different identities and that DNA tests affect their identity self-perceptions. It also demonstrates that DNA tests have social and personal effects that have, until now, been under-explored. As the industry continues to grow in popularity and economically, further research is needed to investigate their effects on individuals and society.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectDNA testen_NZ
dc.subjectBelongingen_NZ
dc.subjectDirect-to-consumer testsen_NZ
dc.subjectThematic analysisen_NZ
dc.subjectBiogeographic ancestryen_NZ
dc.subjectSocial groupsen_NZ
dc.subjectBiological identityen_NZ
dc.subjectPersonal identityen_NZ
dc.subjectEthnic identityen_NZ
dc.subjectCultural identityen_NZ
dc.subjectNational identityen_NZ
dc.subjectReligious identityen_NZ
dc.subjectSelf-perceptionsen_NZ
dc.subjectGenealogyen_NZ
dc.subjectAncestryen_NZ
dc.subjectCommunicationen_NZ
dc.subjectRelationshipsen_NZ
dc.subjectFamily storiesen_NZ
dc.subjectFamily identityen_NZ
dc.subjectPlace connectionen_NZ
dc.title“Where do I Belong?” DNA Test Results and Self-Perceptions of Identityen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Communication Studiesen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2021-04-11T04:35:35Z


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