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dc.contributor.authorHoar, Pen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-19T21:40:54Z
dc.date.available2020-11-19T21:40:54Z
dc.identifier.citationTMG Journal for Media History, 22(2), 43–60. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18146/tmg.592
dc.identifier.issn1387-649Xen_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2213-7653en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/13804
dc.description.abstractNew Zealand as a nation state was born imperial with the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi. The Treaty established a partnership between Māori, the indigenous people, and the British Crown. The Treaty underpins all aspects of modern New Zealand. New Zealand’s history has been one of colonisation with Māori being displaced, despoiled, and deprived of their land, language, and culture. In line with this history of imperial control, radio broadcasting in New Zealand developed according to foreign models. A British-styled BBC model predominated until the 1980s when the wholesale adaptation of neoliberal ideologies saw New Zealand’s media restructured along commercial lines. At the same time, there was a resurgence and revitalisation of Māori culture and influence in New Zealand based around the Treaty of Waitangi. This article outlines the roles of imperialism in the development of New Zealand radio before analysing the rise of Māori broadcasting as a counter-imperial response along with the increasing importance played the Māori language (Te Reo Māori) in New Zealand’s postcolonial media culture.
dc.publisherNetherlands Institute for Sound and Visionen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.tmgonline.nl/article/10.18146/tmg.592/
dc.rights© Peter Morton Hoar, published under license from the author(s). This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. When a paper is accepted for publication, authors will be requested to agree with the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Netherlands License.
dc.subjectMāori radio; Māori language; New Zealand; Imperialism; Media history; Postcolonialism
dc.titleJamming Imperialism: Māori Radio and Postcolonial New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.18146/tmg.592en_NZ
aut.relation.endpage43
aut.relation.issue2en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage43
aut.relation.volume22en_NZ
pubs.elements-id394380
aut.relation.journalTMG Journal for Media Historyen_NZ


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