Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDewes, Oen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTaufa, Nen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWrapson, Wen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSiegert, Ren_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-30T23:20:54Z
dc.date.available2020-06-30T23:20:54Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationSystematic Reviews, 7, 212 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13643-018-0855-x
dc.identifier.issn2046-4053en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2046-4053en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/13472
dc.description.abstractBackground: Bariatric surgery results in substantial medical and economic benefits; however, independent studies typically report high patient preoperative attrition rates. Studies have identified individual characteristics and sociodemographic variables of those who complete the surgery compared to those who do not. The aim of the present protocol is to outline a systematic review focussed on identifying the sociodemographic, medical, cultural, psychological, and patient-led factors affecting preoperative attrition in clients who were enrolled in bariatric surgery programmes. Methods/design: The databases Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and MEDLINE will be searched for retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional observational studies that have identified any sociodemographic, medical, cultural, psychological, and patient-led factors affecting preoperative attrition in clients who are enrolled in a bariatric surgery programme. English-language articles published between 1997 to 2020, inclusive of adults 18 years or older, will be included in the review. This protocol has been registered in PROSPERO, registration number; CRD42017068557. Discussion: Presently, there are studies and reviews investigating population-based utilisation and access to bariatric surgery; however, there is a need to review the reasons behind preoperative bariatric surgery patient attrition once selected for bariatric surgery. The results of the review will highlight potential systematic disparities in patient attrition, where gaps in knowledge remain for further investigation, and suggest areas where countermeasures may be focussed for decreasing attrition rates.en_NZ
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://systematicreviewsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13643-018-0855-x
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.subjectPreoperative; Bariatric surgery; Obesity; Disparities; Systematic review; Humans; Morbid; Obesity surgery; Attrition
dc.titleFactors Associated With Preoperative Attrition in Bariatric Surgery: A Protocol for a Systematic Review 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Servicesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13643-018-0855-xen_NZ
aut.relation.endpage5
aut.relation.issue1en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage1
aut.relation.volume7en_NZ
pubs.elements-id350857
aut.relation.journalSystematic Reviewsen_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record