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dc.contributor.authorConn, Cen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCamnmock, Ren_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFord, Ken_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFaesen Kloet, Gen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorNayar, Sen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-17T04:17:41Z
dc.date.available2020-04-17T04:17:41Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationPacific Health, 3. https://doi.org/10.24135/pacifichealth.v3i0.44
dc.identifier.issn2537-8864en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/13276
dc.description.abstractPacific Island Countries and Territories are facing a health crisis with non communicable diseases (NCDs) currently accounting for more than 80% of deaths. In the 21st century, advances in health intervention and policy render this figure unacceptable. Multiple risk factors contribute to the NCD crisis; a leading driver being obesity due to changing dietary practices arising from the global food system. A system which is dominated by processed foods high in starch and sugars. This situation is compounded by changes in the natural and built environments relating to climate change. Tackling this issue is beyond the sole domain of public health and is, therefore, more suited to a planetary health approach. This paper applies a sustainable food systems approach to analysing NCD policy developments in the Pacific region. In particular, three domains of policy which impact diets in the Pacific are examined: food production, climate change and sustainability, and trade. It is argued that countering the NCD crisis demands a global multisectoral approach, with governments leading the way, to develop integrated policy and interventions that will secure the future wellbeing and protection of our people, our food, our planet.
dc.publisherChild and Youth Health Research Centre, Auckland University of Technology
dc.relation.urihttps://ojs.aut.ac.nz/pacific-health/index.php/pacifichealth/article/view/44
dc.rightsBy publishing in Pacific Health, the authors grant the Journal a Creative Commons nonexclusive worldwide license (CC-BY-NC 4.0) for electronic dissemination of the article via the Internet, and, a nonexclusive right to license others to reproduce, republish, transmit, and distribute the content of the journal. The authors grant the Journal the right to transfer content (without changing it), to any medium or format necessary for the purpose of preservation.
dc.subjectClimate change; Sustainable food systems; Multisectoral approach; Policy; Pacific
dc.titleOur People, Our Food, Our Planet: Sustainable Food Systems Policy in the Pacificen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.24135/pacifichealth.v3i0.44
aut.relation.volume3en_NZ
pubs.elements-id373742
aut.relation.journalPacific Healthen_NZ


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