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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Len_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCooper-Thomas, Hen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Pen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSmollan, Ren_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-11T00:16:50Z
dc.date.available2020-02-11T00:16:50Z
dc.date.copyright2020-01-01en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationHuman Resource Development Quarterly. 2020; 1– 19. https://doi.org/10.1002/hrdq.21384
dc.identifier.issn1044-8004en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1532-1096en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/13129
dc.description.abstractThe socialization of an employee into a new role provides an opportunity for both the newcomer and the organization to maintain or improve current practices. In this paper, integrating ideas from a practice-based perspective with the concept of sensemaking, we draw on the multiple perspectives provided by the newcomer and relevant colleagues to examine the socialization process. Using an inductive, qualitative approach analyzing 21 semi-structured interviews in six organizations with four types of participant—newcomers, and their respective coworkers, managers, and human resource (HR) representatives—our findings shed light on how interactions between newcomers and these three types of insiders influence newcomers' enactment of organizational practices. Specifically, newcomers who received greater sensegiving from insiders had, in turn, more opportunity to sensetest their nascent understandings, and to sensemake using these inputs, leading to the replication of organizational practices. Conversely, newcomers with limited access to sensegiving were less able to sensetest, and instead relied more on previous experiences to make sense of their new environment, leading to the determination of practices. Newcomers with substantial prior work experience used this as a valuable input to sensemaking, allowing quasi-replication and determination of organizational practices that were more likely to be accepted, although not always. Our findings highlight social aspects of socialization as integral to sensemaking processes and performance of practice. In order to optimize socialization, all stakeholders—newcomers, their colleagues, and HR—should consider how the fundamentally social nature of socialization might require each party to adapt their approach.en_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/hrdq.21384
dc.rightsThis is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [see SOURCE], which has been published in final form at [see DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
dc.subjectNewcomers; Organizational socialization; Practice; Role transitions; Sensegiving; Sensemaking; Sensetesting
dc.titleReclaiming the Social in Socialization: A Practice-based Understanding of Newcomer Adjustmenten_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hrdq.21384en_NZ
pubs.elements-id370292
aut.relation.journalHuman Resource Development Quarterlyen_NZ


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