Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCrowther, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorSmythe, Een_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-03T23:19:05Z
dc.date.available2020-02-03T23:19:05Z
dc.date.copyright2016en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBMC Pregnancy Childbirth 16, 370 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-016-1164-9
dc.identifier.issn1471-2393en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1471-2393en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/13119
dc.description.abstractBackground There are interwoven personal, professional and organisational relationships to be navigated in maternity in all regions. In rural regions relationships are integral to safe maternity care. Yet there is a paucity of research on how relationships influence safety and nurture satisfying experiences for rural maternity care providers and mothers and families in these regions. This paper draws attention to how these relationships matter. Methods This research is informed by hermeneutic phenomenology drawing on Heidegger and Gadamer. Thirteen participants were recruited via purposeful sampling and asked to share their experiences of rural maternity care in recorded unstructured in-depth interviews. Participants were women and health care providers living and working in rural regions. Recordings were transcribed and data interpretively analysed until a plausible and trustworthy thematic pattern emerged. Results Throughout the data the relational nature of rural living surfaced as an interweaving tapestry of connectivity. Relationships in rural maternity are revealed in myriad ways: for some optimal relationships, for others feeling isolated, living with discord and professional disharmony. Professional misunderstandings undermine relationships. Rural maternity can become unsustainable and unsettling when relationships break down leading to unsafeness. Conclusions This study reveals how relationships are an important and vital aspect to the lived-experience of rural maternity care. Relationships are founded on mutual understanding and attuned to trust matter. These relationships are forged over time and keep childbirth safe and enable maternity care providers to work sustainably. Yet hidden unspoken pre-understandings of individuals and groups build tension in relationships leading to discord. Trust builds healthy rural communities of practice within which everyone can flourish, feel accepted, supported and safe. This is facilitated by collaborative learning activities and open respectful communication founded on what matters most (safe positive childbirth) whilst appreciating and acknowledging professional and personal differences.en_NZ
dc.languageengen_NZ
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12884-016-1164-9
dc.rightsOpen Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.subjectDiscorden_NZ
dc.subjectGPsen_NZ
dc.subjectMidwivesen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectPhenomenologyen_NZ
dc.subjectRelationshipsen_NZ
dc.subjectRural maternityen_NZ
dc.subjectSafetyen_NZ
dc.titleOpen, Trusting Relationships Underpin Safety in Rural Maternity a Hermeneutic Phenomenology Studyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12884-016-1164-9en_NZ
aut.relation.articlenumber370en_NZ
aut.relation.volume16en_NZ
pubs.elements-id215242
aut.relation.journalBMC Pregnancy and Childbirthen_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record