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dc.contributor.advisorYeap, Albert
dc.contributor.authorSamiei, Saba
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-05T03:34:02Z
dc.date.available2019-11-05T03:34:02Z
dc.date.copyright2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/12967
dc.description.abstractIn 2017, the world economic forum announced that AI would increase the global economy by USD 16 trillion by 2030 (World Economic Forum, 2017). Yet, at the same time, some of the world’s most influential leaders warned us about the danger of AI. Is AI good or bad? Of utmost importance, is AI an existential threat to humanity? This thesis examines the latter question by breaking it down into three sub-questions, is the danger real?, is the defence adequate?, and how a doomsday scenario could happen?, and critically reviewing the literature in search for an answer. If true, and sadly it is, I conclude that AI is an existential threat to humanity. The arguments are as follows. The current rapid developments of robots, the success of machine learning, and the emergence of highly profitable AI companies will guarantee the rise of the machines among us. Sadly, among them are machines that are destructive, and the danger becomes real. A review of current ideas preventing such a doomsday event is, however, shown to be inadequate and a futuristic look at how doomsday could emerge is, unfortunately, promising!en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectArtificial intelligenceen_NZ
dc.subjectAIen_NZ
dc.subjectEthicsen_NZ
dc.subjectDanger of AIen_NZ
dc.subjectAI Ethicsen_NZ
dc.titleOn the Danger of Artificial Intelligenceen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Computer and Information Sciencesen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2019-11-05T02:50:35Z


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