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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Gen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-20T03:44:31Z
dc.date.available2019-08-20T03:44:31Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationMAI Journal 2019: volume 8, issue 1
dc.identifier.issn1177-5904en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/12752
dc.description.abstractThis article illuminates the embryonic academic practice of writing doctoral theses in te reo Mäori, storying the experiences of graduates, supervisors, examiners and senior managers involved in this pathway. In keeping with Indigenous sensibilities, a narrative research approach is adopted, whereby analysis proceeds by carefully curating interview data to tell a compelling insider story of the reo Mäori doctoral journey. This narrative research process respects the teaching power of stories, told in the voices of pioneers in this field, and brings forward a joyful counter-narrative to the dominant detrimental research stories about Mäori university education.
dc.publisherNgā Pae o te Māramatanga
dc.relation.urihttp://www.journal.mai.ac.nz/content/he-iti-he-pounamu-significance-doctoral-theses-written-te-reo-m%C4%81ori
dc.rightsMAI Journal is an open access journal that publishes multidisciplinary peer-reviewed articles that critically analyse and address indigenous and Pacific issues in the context of Aotearoa New Zealand.
dc.subjectIndigenous doctoral studies; Kaupapa Māori; Narrative research; Te reo Māori
dc.titleHe iti, he pounamu: The Significance of Doctoral Theses Written in Te Reo Māorien_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.20507/MAIJournal.2019.8.1.6en_NZ
aut.relation.endpage90
aut.relation.issue1en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage77
aut.relation.volume8en_NZ
pubs.elements-id362877
aut.relation.journalMAI Reviewen_NZ


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