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dc.contributor.authorEngels-Schwarzpaul, A-CTen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-18T01:50:28Z
dc.date.available2018-12-18T01:50:28Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationThe Contemporary Pacific 29(1), 38-63.
dc.identifier.issn1043-898Xen_NZ
dc.identifier.issn1527-9464en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/12116
dc.description.abstractThe paper explores the mutual impact of Pacific houses and people in diasporic relationships. Tracing the fates of several whare and fale now located in Europe, it explores changes over time that resulted from different degrees of closeness or distance between the people gathered around them. Three houses feature prominently in the paper: Hinemihi o te Ao Tawhito in Clandon Park (close to London, UK); Rauru at the Museum für Völkerkunde (Hamburg, Germany); and a fale from Apia at the Tropical Islands Resort (close to Berlin, Germany). They enjoy and have historically enjoyed different degrees of connection with their source communities, which, I suggest, directly impact their role and state of being in their current locations. What their stories show is that identities and angles of vision change in particular ways during processes of colonization and globalization. These changes are relevant for local and global cultural developments and their role in cultural tourism, but also for the consideration of global identities generally. Together, Pacific notions of generative (rather than objectifying) relationships between people, and Benjamin’s notion of a performative relationship between present and past opening new angles and future possibilities, suggest that present and past relationships can be redeemed.en_NZ
dc.languageengen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Hawaii Pressen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://muse.jhu.edu/article/646629
dc.rightsAuthor retains the rights at any time during the Exclusivity Period: (i) reproduce and distribute a reasonable number of copies of any version of the Contribution, including but not limited to the published version, or portions or derivative works thereof, in the course of your teaching, research, conference presentations and similar professional, scientific, or academic activities (but not permit commercial publication or widespread distribution of the Contribution or any significant portion or derivative work thereof); (ii) post or otherwise make any version of the Contribution, or portions or derivative works thereof, available on your personal web site; and (iii) if and as required by your employing institution(s) or your funding source(s), make any version of the Contribution available on digital repositories; provided in each case UHP (and Generic UHP Journal) is cited as the first/forthcoming publisher of the Contribution and you accurately distinguish any modified version of the Contribution from that published or to be published by us.
dc.subjectGlobalization and cultural changeen_NZ
dc.subjectIndigenous knowledgeen_NZ
dc.subjectMuseum studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectPacific Island studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectPostcolonial studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectSpatial practicesen_NZ
dc.subjectTourismen_NZ
dc.subjectGlobalization and cultural change; Spatial practices; Indigenous knowledge; Pacific Island studies; Postcolonial studies; Museum studies, Tourism
dc.titleTraveling Houses: Performing Diasporic Relationships in Europeen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1353/cp.2017.0002en_NZ
aut.relation.endpage64
aut.relation.issue1en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage38
aut.relation.volume29en_NZ
pubs.elements-id219396
aut.relation.journalContemporary Pacificen_NZ


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